We spent four hours making this Lego London Bus (and it was totally worth it) – Wired.co.uk

The Lego Creator Expert series – which has previously featured a Mini Cooper with a picnic set and the cult VW Camper Van – has added a new icon to its garage: the London double-decker bus.

The London Bus 10285 (£109.99) was released on July 1 as a London Lego Store exclusive until it goes on wider release later in the month – but WIRED got an early peek, and decided to film ourselves building it in a marathon four-hour session.

The 1,686-piece build itself is pretty straightforward, starting with the chassis, and only gets more complex as you begin to add the layers of detail, in particular, the seats. There are so many seats to make – 29 in total. If you enjoy building seats, this is the Lego set for you. But they do look great once they’re installed, so don’t be put off.

I hadn’t tackled a Lego set with such a huge number of red bricks before, and there’s something about that particular shade of brick that means it snaps together with a really crisp click – words cannot convey just how satisfying this is. (Lego fans will know what I mean.) The method for creating rounded bodywork is particularly clever, using curved roofing tiles that are side-mounted on separate strips. The finished bus is a solid, glossy slab of colour that leaps out at you and looks great from lots of angles.

This being Lego, the destination signage gleefully embraces its love of a terrible pun – your ride is heading to ‘Brickston’ via ‘Brickadilly Circus’. You can flip the hoardings to display either a 50s-style biscuit advert, or a modern-day tourism plug, and the number plates are also swappable – pick vintage black or modern white and yellow. Among the parts making their debut in this set are the standard tread-pattern tyres – you might not notice them, but it’s the kind of added accuracy that lets you know Lego really cared about getting this set right.

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Like the rest of the vehicles in the Creator line, the bus interior features a wealth of authentic details, in this case, ones familiar to any London commuter: a perilously narrow spiral stair, blobs of pink gum under the seats, tatty upholstery, an abandoned newspaper and soda can, and a forgotten umbrella. (You’ll have to use your imagination for the sticky floor.) Such thoughtful additions don’t go to waste, as the top deck and roof can be split off for your viewing pleasure. Now, when is Lego going to make a Night Tube carriage, complete with takeaway boxes and a puddle of sick?

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